Guitar

Flamenco Guitar

Sugar per Chitarra (extra)

These strings have been developed following the indications we received from Ruben Diaz (that has been a pupil and close collaborator of Paco de Lucia): according to Paco de Lucia, as a matter of fact, the tension of the strings used for Flamenco needed to be further increased as compared to those used on the classical guitar, while making sure that all strings had the same tactile feel under the fingers (i.e. the “equal feel” that ancient lutenists referred to). Thanks to these indications, we were able to develop this special set that we want to dedicate to Paco.

The bass strings are made with a special protective varnish that not only assures less noise under the fingers, but it also prevents allergic reactions to metals, and the unwanted oxidation processes that frequently occur on common strings with silver plated copper wounding.

With a trasparent look that resembles crystal glass, the Sugar Guitar Trebles, conceived in Extra tension to be used in Flamenco, are made using a recently discovered Italian blend of a plastic material derived from sugar-cane.

The sound of these strings is clearly brilliant, clean and prompt, and provide great acoustic power. Unlike Fluorocarbon strings, these strings have an excellent vibrato and a remarkable timbre variation when played very close to the bridge and then up over the sound hole. Laboratory tests showed that Sugar strings have a projection of sound (measured in Joules) and a sustain respectively 24% and 18% more than fluorocarbon strings.

These strings have, in their extremes, the sweetness and singability of gut and the clearness and promptness typical of Fluorocarbon. Another important property is the characteristic sustain, which by scientific measurements is superior to any type of string currently available in the market.
Another measured feature is the sound projection: our scientific tests have shown that it is superior to Fluorocarbon strings. Although the surface is extremely smooth, the grip on the fingers is remarkable; in other words it is never slippery.

NOTICE

In the event of a squeaking sound that appears at the beginning under the right hand fingers, it is suggested to use a hand lotion, or even better a softening paste used to adhere to sheets of paper.

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Granato

A unique look and a strong, consistent sound. Until now, it was necessary to increase a string’s gauge to reach lower frequencies. But increasing the string’s diameter also increases the internal dampening. That makes the string less bright, less responsive and more muffled:the thicker the string, the duller the sound. Our revolutionary new approach —never introduced before us— changes the specific weight of the material, increasing it progressively to leave the gauges almost unchanged as possible is.
The result is amazing: the instrument sounds brighter and with a vey fast attack, more powerful and more responsive through the entire range of the fretboard. The strings also maintain their intonation better (because thicker strings need to be fretted harder, pulling them farther out of tune).

The basses, at the contrary, are designed with a short sustain and with more percussive effect: this is very suitable for the rasgueado style.
THE GRANATO SERIES sets provide superior performance over traditional Flamenco strings for musicians who love clear, sharp sounds and powerful voicing across the full scale of the instrument.

You never heard a sound like this before, simply because it did not exist.

Notice

There are different percentages of metal powder inside the polymer, in order to optimize each string’s performance within the set. Because of this, the color varies slightly on each string.

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Did you know that the six strings of the guitar do not have all the same tension?

Did you know that the six strings of the guitar do not have all the same tension?

Contrary to what one might think, the strings of a classical guitar set do not follow an equal tension profile.

Tension evaluation method:

The most common method used to evaluate the degree of tension of a string on a guitar, is to apply a pression, using the right hand fingers, right near to the bridge: a set is considered well balanced if all the strings oppose the same force to the pressing finger. One might come to the conclusion that all strings have been calculated with the same working tension.

But this kind of evaluation is actually a ‘tactile sensation’ of the tension, and not the real tension expressed in kilograms or pounds, as one could measure using appropriate instruments. Following a law of Physics, two strings that have the same lateral movement by means of the same pressure applied on the same point (as could be the pressing finger), will also have the same tension, expressed in Kg (or lb). But this same tension does not correspond with the one used in the necessary calculation to determine the gauges of the string.

The physical nature of the strings:

When they are exposed to traction, the strings stretch (this is particularly more evident when turning the peg during the tuning); this implies, as a consequence, a progressive thinning of the diameter. But together with the reduction of the diameter, there will also be a reduction of the working tension, proportional to the originally calculated tension. The stretch amount is not the same for all strings; its maximum is observed on the chanterelles, it will be less on the second, and even less on the third: it is well known that the number of turns on the peg of the chantarelle is way higher than the ones needed for the third string. As a consequence, a set that has been calculated using an equal tension, once tuned correctly would be completely unbalanced.
This fact is inevitable: a guitar not only has strings of heterogeneous physical nature (the first three are synthetic monofilaments, while the basses, instead, are composed of two paired materials, like a synthetic core and a metallic wounding), but its diameters are different and each string is used at a different “Working Index” (that is expressed as the product of the frequency and the vibating length of the string). As a result of all this, the achievement of a homogeneous tactile feel of the tension among the strings is actually a more complex thing as compared to the simple theoretical calculation, where the parameter for the tension is assumed as a constant.

Conclusions:

The scaling of the tension is therefore a compensation process that is carefully studied and applied by the string-maker in order to neutralize, string by string, the thinning of the diameter caused by the stretching of the string during traction: once stabilized in their tuning, each string will decrease its value in percentage until they reach a working tension similar to the other strings. Thus all the strings will show the same bending, when pressed with a finger. From a practical point of view, if the chanterelle will experimentally decrease of a 2%, the diameter in the starting calculations needs to be increased by a 2%, and so on with all the remaining strings.

But, in practice, the gradient of the tension profile needs to be even more emphasised: the aim of this exaggeration of the scaling of the tension is to more efficiently oppose the increase of frequency of the thicker strings on the higher frets (on the second string and even more on the third). In the past, when gut strings were used, this exaggeration was not needed because thicker strings were automatically produced using a higher torsion (making them more elastic), while with modern synthetic monofilaments each string has the same stretching coeffficient.
This measure for synthetic strings, however, has been proven not to be completely enough; a series of compensatory measures on the bone of the bridge is therefore often needed, such as changing its inclination.


Discover our sounds for classical guitar

Our direction is discovering new sounds

Curious to hear yourself what is the difference between our classical guitar sets?

On this page you can listen to the same opera played by the same guitarist using all our sets.

Composer: Sylvius Leopold Weiss 1687-1750
Opera: Ouverture (excerpt)
Musician: Alberto Rassu
Guitar: F.lli Lodi

The recordings were made with Zoom h2n without editing or post production.

Sound characteristics

The sets below are ordered by decreasing brillance of sound

SUGAR FOR CLASSICAL GUITAR

Bright sound similar to Fluorocarbon but at the same time highly performing in vibrato, with great timbrical variation responding to variations of the right hand, and surprising sustain

Sustain
Brightness
Promptness
Singability

RUBINO

The brightest and sharpest sound ever, superior to Fluorocarbon, sharp and clear promptness on sound attack, good timbre modulation

Sostegno
Brightness
Promptness
Singability

ALCHEMIA

bright sound similar to Fluorocarbon but at the same time highly performing in vibrato, great timbrical variation responding to variations of the right hand, surprising sustain

Sustain
Brightness
Promptness
Singability

ZAFFIRO

Medium brightness and at the same time rich sound, allowing fair expressiveness

Sustain
Brightness
Promptness
Singability

ALABASTRO

Excellent performance qualities similar to gut strings, with a better brightness than nylon but not as much as fluorocarbon, excellent sound attack

Sustain
Brightness
Promptness
Singability

AMBRA 2000

The highest level of nuances and expressiveness on vibrato, excellent bright attack but never excessive, round and rich basses

Sustain
Brightness
Promptness
Singability

CRISTALLO

Fairly brilliant tone, superior than the average tone of nylon, prompt and expressive sound, excellent vibrato

Sustain
Brightness
Promptness
Singability

PERLA

Warm and mellow sound, round and rich tone, good expressiveness and sweetness of sound that make them an ideal choice to fill the concert hall

Sustain
Brightness
Promptness
Singability

Orchestra Series

HOW TO PLAY SYMPHONIC MUSIC (Brahms, Verdi, Beethoven, ecc.) USING JUST CLASSICAL GUITARS?

The Orchestra series represents our best answer to musicians who wish to expand the possibilities of duets / quartets etc where all the guitars have the same tuning (for educational purposes, compositions etc). All this is achieved without having to buy a new instrument, but using those already available. Guitar sets of Orchestra series indeed have the peculiarity of being designed to be installed on traditional guitar. Starting from now, it is no longer necessary to have, for example, a terz guitar, an acoustic bass guitar, etc.

This solution allows us to keep it cheap (point always welcome in school and musical insitutions) and simplicity of installation: by changing the set - keeping the same instrument -  you can expand the musical range up to cover the entire series of Symphony Orchestra (From Double Bass to Violin).
In the case of the Violin range, a capo placed at 5th fret is required; as further alternative it is possible to use a Guilele in which our set high E cod. 145C has been installed.
Many advantages of this series go from musical education, to concerts to today composers.